December 12, 2010

Center-wide CEINT REU program funded by NSF

CEINT has been award funding from the National Science Foundation to create a new Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program beginning summer 2011. This summer research experience for undergraduates will allow students to focus on research organized across a comprehensive, [...]

October 27, 2010

Jeremy Gernand, recipient of 2010 SRA Student Merit Award

A paper written by CEINT doctoral student, Jeremy Gernand, has been selected to receive the 2010 student merit award from the Society of Risk Analysis Emerging Nanoscale Materials Specialty Group. In December, Gernand will present his paper titled, “Identifying Information-rich characterization [...]

October 08, 2010

Evidence for Bioavailability of Au NPs from Soil within Earthworms

Jason Unrine, University of Kentucky, and colleagues are perhaps the first to demonstrate that a soil organism can ingest gold nanoparticles from their surrounding soil and accumulate them in their tissues. This CEINT-sponsored research was published in a paper titled, "Evidence for Bioavailability [...]

October 01, 2010

Fate of Nanoparticles in Waste

Bojeong Kim is first author on a recent CEINT-sponsored research paper published in Environmental Science and Technology titled, "Discovery and Characterization of Silver Sulfide Nanoparticles in Final Sewage Sludge Products" (DOI: 10.1021/es101565j). This paper represents research conducted by Dr [...]

October 01, 2010

Stacey Louie Receives EPA STAR Fellowship

Stacey Louie is a 2010 recipient of the EPA STAR (Science to Achieve Results) fellowship. Louie is a doctoral student studying at Carnegie Mellon University, under the guidance of faculty adviser Dr. Greg Lowry, CEINT Deputy Director, and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering. The STAR [...]

July 29, 2010

CEINT Adds New International Nano-Safety Initiative

The cleanliness of our water faces pressures from many directions. More factories mean more discharges, a growing population leads to more wastewater, and more runoff from lawns and farms carries pollutants into waterways. While there are many elements in water that may be harmful to people and the [...]

April 04, 2010

CEINT Participates in NanoDays 2010

For the second consecutive year, the Center for the Environmental Implications for NanoTechnology (CEINT), headquartered at Duke University, has partnered with the NISE Network (Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network), the largest public outreach initiative in nanoscale informal science [...]

April 03, 2010

Christina Arnaout awarded honorable mention in NSF GRFP Competition

Christina Arnaout is a honorable mention recipient for the 2010 National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program Competition. An environmental engineering Ph.D. student at Duke University, Arnaout is a member of the Environmental Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory and a student of [...]

March 09, 2010

High school student wins first place at regional science fair

LEXINGTON, Ky., Victor Macrinici, a high school student at Paul Laurence Dunbar in Lexington won first place in the environmental science category at the Central Kentucky Regional Science and Engineering Fair. His project studied the effects of silver nanoparticles on nematodes, which are small [...]

December 21, 2009

Pratt Scientist Named AAAS Fellow

For his work probing the environmental implications of the burgeoning field of nanotechnology, Mark Wiesner, professor of civil and environmental engineering at Duke University, was elected as a fellow to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Because of their unique [...]

November 04, 2009

Diver, Chemist Joins Pratt Faculty

For centuries, the forces of weather and winds have sent more than 500 ships to the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean off North Carolina’s coast. Some were also brought down by another terrifying force -- German U-boat torpedoes during the Second World War. Forty miles off the coast from Morehead City [...]

September 14, 2009

When Nano May Not Be Nano

DURHAM, N.C. – The same properties of nanoparticles that make them so appealing to manufacturers may also have negative effects on the environment and human health. However, little is known which particles may be harmful. Part of the problem is determining exactly what a nanoparticle is. A new [...]

August 18, 2009

How Mercury Becomes Toxic in the Environment

DURHAM, N.C. – Naturally occurring organic matter in water and sediment appears to play a key role in helping microbes convert tiny particles of mercury in the environment into a form that is dangerous to most living creatures. This finding is important, say Duke University environmental engineers [...]

May 20, 2009

Novel Approach Estimates Nanoparticles in Environment

DURHAM, N.C. Without knowing how much of an industrial chemical is being produced, it is almost impossible for scientists to determine if it poses any threat to the environment or human health. Civil engineers at Duke University believe they have come up with a novel way of estimating how much of [...]

October 02, 2008

New Alliance to Develop Nanotoxicology Protocols

A team of materials scientists and toxicologists announced the formation of a new international research alliance to establish protocols for reproducible toxicological testing of nanomaterials in both cultured cells and animals. Pratt's Mark Wiesner, James L. Meriam Professor of Civil and [...]